USA Acupuncture Seminars 2015 Done!

It was with great pleasure and immense gratitude that I travelled over to the USA this last month to teach as pecks of the Neijing Acupuncture style to my fellow practitioners and students. My first stop was in Kansas City, where acupuncturist Dr. Chris Powell was my host. We had a great time eating magnificent food and doing a full day seminar on the very specialised Renying / Cunkou pulse diagnosis technique of the Neijing. I am looking forward to returning to Kansas City to teach advanced needling techniques and more in 2016.

Following this was my return, after 3 years, to Portland, Oregon. I consider Portland a second home and have many close friends, some family to me, who live and practice there. I presented a 2 day seminar on the core needling chapters of the Neijing to a great group of people - a group that was a mixture of students past, long time practitioners, scholars, and friends. We steadily went through the classical methods one by one and enjoyed some practical time as well. In 2016 I will be kicking off the Neijing clinical program there with the diagnostic weekends - where pulse, complexion, and palpation techniques are taught in depth. It was a very special time for me in Portland this year as I reconnected with my old Neijing ISSCA crew and also was able to stay with my classical brother Dr. Verluys in his amazing home with his incredible family. 

Teaching has been a part of my Chinese medicine life as much as practice has. 2015 is 13th consecutive year of teaching undergraduate acupuncture and the 3rd year since the launch of the Institute of Neijing Research (INR). I look forward to many more years of teaching this incredible art, science, and medicine.

In Good Health...

Dr. White

Dr. White Teaching in Portland, OR.

Dr. White Teaching in Portland, OR.



Portland Acupuncture Seminars

2015 Neijing Lingshu Classical Acupuncture Seminar

 Neijing Medicine: The 27 Techniques of the Guanzhen

Physiology, Pathology, and Practice

Presented by: David White

September 26 and 27 2015

East West College of Healing Arts: 525 NE Oregon St, PORTLAND, OR, 97232 USA

Synopsis:

The Huangdi Neijing 黃帝內經 is a clinical manual, a philosophical guide, and a scientific treatise. Originating in the Han era (206BCE – 220CE) of ancient China the text had immense influence over the formation and growth of all East-Asian medicine over the last two millennia. A classical manual written and contributed by multiple authors, the Neijing offers unique clinical insights, and above all a complete medical system.

This seminar will present chapter 7 of the Huangdi Neijing Lingshu 黃帝內經靈樞, titled Guanzhen 官針 or Manipulation of Needles. It is the guiding chapter of classical Han acupuncture methodology. 27 techniques in total are discussed in this chapter, their mechanics, and subtle hints to the pathophysiology that each technique may be employed for. During this seminar these hints will be expanded upon and cross-referenced with the entire text to give each participant a great comprehension of the why and how of classical acupuncture technique. This format was chosen for those that have both studied elements of the Neijing and for those that have no experience with the text. It introduces, through the 27 techniques, foundations of Neijing Medicine as well as advanced methods for treating serious disease with acupuncture.

Over two days David White will present the clinical approach of Neijing Classical Acupuncture and draw on his years of private practice, clinical and archival research, and over a decade of tuition under the renowned Dr. David Tai in needling methodology. Included in this discussion will be a number of case studies from both Dr. White’s and Dr. Tai’s private practices. Time will also be allocated for demonstration and guided practice of not only needling but diagnostics as well.

Day One: 9.30 – 12.30

·      Introduction to Neijing Medicine, Dr. White’s practice and the lineage of Dr. David Tai.

·      Introduction to the Guanzhen, structure, contents and importance.

·      Categories of techniques, base diagnostics for this seminar.

Day One: 1.30 – 5.00

·      The Nine Techniques for the Nine Pathological Changes

·      Practice.

Day Two: 9.30 – 12.30

·      The Twelve Techniques that Correspond to the Twelve Channels.

·      Practice.

Day Two: 1.30 – 5.00

·      The Five Techniques that Correspond to the Five Zang.

·      Practice

·      Conclusion.

About the Speaker:

David White is a scholar-physician residing in Sydney, Australia. He has studied classical Chinese thought and medicine since a young age under a number of teachers. His passion and focus for the pre-Han and Han era of Chinese medicine stems from an unwavering search for understanding of the clinical origins of acupuncture. David maintains a private practice on Sydney’s North Shore and has been a senior lecturer at the Sydney Institute of Chinese Medicine for over twelve years. He is the director of the Institute of Neijing Research (INR)

Registration:

Please email info@neijingmedicine.com for all registration and payment details. Cost of this seminar is $300 for practitioners and $250 for students.

www.neijingmedicine.com

classicalneijingacupuncture

Meditation and Reduction...

Over the New Year break I was lucky enough to once again travel to the serene highlands of Tasmania for a trek and some quiet time by a beautiful lake. Often in clinic I am asked about meditation, what methods I use, and how to overcome the initial stages of feeling like one can’t simply sit or even be still. When I first started learning meditation methods, I did so through the practice of movement and martial arts. Stillness cultivated through non-stillness. To this day I still practice this way. Walking through the central highlands of Tasmania over tough mountains with a heavy pack, for me, IS the meditation.

After such treks I insure that I have proper down time. This is stillness cultivated through stillness. Sitting and observing still water is one of the essential steps towards innate understanding of self. As I sat looking at the reflections of the water, a fly-fisherman standing statue-like in the water, and watching the subtle changes of the water’s surface I was brought back to some great observations by Laozi and Zhuangzi.

“All things are together in action,
but I look to their non-action.”

 Laozi 16.

 Similarly we must look to action to observe non-action as one is unable to exist without the other. Looking to the stillness of water and the gentle movements of the fly-fisherman, Zhuangzi 15 comes to mind. Levels of self-realistion, enlightenment, being, and understanding are discussed at length. Thompson lists them as such:

 1.     The scholar in the mountain valley who is a sullen social critic.

2.     The scholar in society who devotes himself to teaching and learning.

3.     The scholar in court and councils who serves his sovereign and state.

4.     The scholar of the rivers and seas who withdraws from the world, and idles and fishes.

5.     The scholar who devotes himself to practicing yoga and breathing exercises (neigong).

6.     The sage who transcends yet subsumes the other levels.

Interestingly it is the fisherman who comes closer to understanding Dao and self than those in study or in society due to the proximity to nature and above all water. Withdrawal from society and inward reflection is best achieved essentially where humans are unable to go. In this way one turns their gaze inwards.

By no means is this easy in today’s world. Most places are already occupied, livings need to made, things accumulated, lives need to be lead, right? Well it is true. So how are we supposed to then find such stillness amidst so much chaos? How are we meant to simply be still, meditate, when so much is needed of us? Laozi 48 says:

“Those who seek learning gain every day
those who seek the Way lose every day
they lose and they lose
until they find nothing to do
nothing to do means nothing not done
those who rule the world aren’t busy
those who are busy
can’t rule the world.”

Step by step reducing daily accumulations allows for a clearer mental state and hence stress free environment. Sure we can study, we can have professions, however, we can also do more with less. Less “things”, less foods, alcohol, sex, drugs, rock and roll and of course, through this we gain. We gain time. We gain peace. And we gain self. Above all, enjoy yourself and have fun :)

In Good Health,

David White Classical Acupuncture